California Is Letting Thousands of Prisoners Out Early. Its Housing Crisis Is Keeping Them From Starting Over.
Mother Jones, December 2019
By Marisa Endicott
Many people end up in 12-step programs even if they don’t have addiction issues, or in other facilities that resemble the prisons they just left.
Read the article

Please Help With this important Survey for Nonprofits

 

CalNonprofits needs to hear the experiences and needs of nonprofits with government contracts so we can get that information to government leaders. If you have contracts with federal, state, county, or local government agencies, please complete this questionnaire.

More than 1,000 nonprofits signed the letter to California's leaders calling for urgent measures to support nonprofits and the work we do. Now we are working to demonstrate to state leaders where and how nonprofits are struggling to provide important services and to make payroll because their government contracts are being treated without flexibility and inconsistently from one agency to another.

Then take 5 minutes to fill out this questionnaire.

 

California Makes Major Bail Change To Slow The Spread Of Coronavirus In Jails
Bail will be set at $0 for most misdemeanors and low-level felony offenses.
The Appeal by Kira Lerner Apr 06, 2020
The California Judicial Council on Monday issued a statewide emergency order setting bail at $0 for most misdemeanor and lower-level felony offenses. The sweeping measure is the state’s latest effort to empty its jails to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus.

LARRP now has an extensive resource page devoted to COVID-19

We are updating it Daily!!!

Upcoming Events

LARRP Committee Meetings

Education Committee Meeting

April 16,2020
4:00pm-5:30pm 

LARRP Employment Committee Meeting

Thu Apr 23, 2020
2:00 -3:30 pm

Partner Events

Friday April 24th
10:30am - 3:00pm
Building F5 Room F5-101Voices Of Our Paths To Greatness

In partnership and collaboration with LARRP, the LATTC Career Center, LATTC Vernon-Central WorkSource Center and community partners, as a part of the LATTC 2nd Annual National Reentry Week Symposium present: Voices Of Our Paths To Greatness.

A professional development presentation followed by an open panel discussion with Reentry Scholars, who will share their experiences, challenges and triumphs related to their journeys from prison or jail to college, as they work to reach their educational, career and life goals.  This presentation and interactive panel discussion will include opportunities for dialogue between the students on the panel and the audience.

In partnership and collaboration with LARRP, the LATTC Career Center, LATTC Vernon-Central WorkSource Center and community partners, as a part of the LATTC 2nd Annual National Reentry Week Symposium present: Voices Of Our Paths To Greatness.

A professional development presentation followed by an open panel discussion with Reentry Scholars, who will share their experiences, challenges and triumphs related to their journeys from prison or jail to college, as they work to reach their educational, career and life goals.  This presentation and interactive panel discussion will include opportunities for dialogue between the students on the panel and the audience.

FREE Prop 47 Expungement Clinic For LATTC Students

Friday, April 24, 2020
10:00am - 2:00pm
ASO, Room, C-105
Tom Bradley Student Center for Student Life

LATTC 2nd Annual National Reentry Week Symposium

April 24th - April 30th, 2020
Day 1: Friday April 24th, 2020 - Prop 47 Clinic For Students & Community Members
Day 2: Monday April 27th - Voices Of Our Women
Day 3: Tuesday April 28th - Voices Of Our Scholars: Universities of California/Cal States/Community Colleges.
Day 4: Wednesday April 29th - Voices Of Our Paths To Greatness
Day 5: Thursday April 30th - Voices In Employment

Los Angeles Trade Technical College
400 West Washington Boulevard
Bldg E5 Room E5-101
Los Angeles, CA 90015

More Info

Please Help With this important Survey for Nonprofits

CalNonprofits needs to hear the experiences and needs of nonprofits with government contracts so we can get that information to government leaders. If you have contracts with federal, state, county, or local government agencies, please complete this questionnaire.

More than 1,000 nonprofits signed the letter to California's leaders calling for urgent measures to support nonprofits and the work we do. Now we are working to demonstrate to state leaders where and how nonprofits are struggling to provide important services and to make payroll because their government contracts are being treated without flexibility and inconsistently from one agency to another.

Then take 5 minutes to fill out this questionnaire.

Seventy people at a San Francisco homeless shelter tested positive for the virus.

NYTimes, April 10, 2020
Seventy people have tested positive for coronavirus at one of San Francisco’s largest homeless shelters, Mayor London Breed said on Friday. The number included two staff members.

The outbreak is the largest reported at a single shelter in the United States and reinforces a major fear in California that the state’s 150,000 homeless people, many of whom have pre-existing respiratory illnesses, are especially vulnerable to the pandemic

Read More

Pledge to protect the most Vulnerable during Covid 19
Our long time partner, Californians for Safety and Justice has asked everyone to sign this important petition. We know that people coming home from incarceration, and those living with past convictions face a myriad of legal restrictions, most urgently, barriers to housing and public benefits. In light of the pandemic, and calls for Americans to shelter in place, there needs to be swift and decisive action by national, state and local governments.

Get Involved!

Corona Virus Helpful Info:

Everyone and every Department within LA County is working together to help slow the spread of this virus.  Public Health continues to recommend that the public do the following to protect themselves and others from respiratory illnesses:

  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unclean hands.
  • Limit close contact, like kissing and sharing cups or utensils, with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve (not your hands).
  • Facemasks are most effective when used appropriately by health care workers and those directly caring for people who are sick and by people who are sick (source control).
  • Get a flu immunization to prevent influenza if you have not done so this season.

Always check with trusted sources for the latest accurate information about novel coronavirus:

County government

Keep up with the Board of Supervisors meetings, motions and resources at LARRP Steering Committee member, Joseph Maizlish’s site

Opportunities

TUITION INCENTIVE PROGRAM

Now accepting applications!

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Division of Substance Abuse Prevention and Control (DPH-SAPC), in partnership with the California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP), is recruiting highly motivated individuals
to enroll into the Tuition Incentive Program (TIP) for Certified Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Counselors.
  • Application Deadline: April 1, 2020
  • Program Start Date: May 16, 2020
  • Program Length: 336 hours over 56 weeks (weekends only)
For more information and to download the TIP application, please click here:

Please note: LARRP General Meetings and other events are open to the public. By attending, you consent to having your voice and likeness recorded, photographed, posted on LARRP's website and social media, and included in LARRP's materials and publications for noncommercial purposes. If you don't want to be photographed or recorded, please let the facilitator know so you can be seated accordingly.

News

Seventy people at a San Francisco homeless shelter tested positive for the virus.

NYTimes, April 10, 2020
Seventy people have tested positive for coronavirus at one of San Francisco’s largest homeless shelters, Mayor London Breed said on Friday. The number included two staff members.

The outbreak is the largest reported at a single shelter in the United States and reinforces a major fear in California that the state’s 150,000 homeless people, many of whom have pre-existing respiratory illnesses, are especially vulnerable to the pandemic

Read More

We need help': Alabama prisoner pleas for assistance in fighting COVID-19 | ABC News

ABC News, Apr 5, 2020

For an archive of reentry and criminal justice related news, please see our News Archive which goes back years!

'They're All Really Afraid': Coronavirus Spreads In Federal Prisons

NPR, April 7, 2020, by Ryan Lucas
Federal prisons are wrestling with the rapid spread of the coronavirus at more than two dozen facilities across the country in an outbreak that has already claimed the lives of at least seven inmates and infected almost 200 more, as well as 63 staff.
Why Jails Are So Important in the Fight Against Coronavirus

NYTimes, The Upshot, By Anna Flagg and Joseph Neff
Published March 31, 2020 Updated April 2, 2020

With about 200,000 people flowing into and out of jails every week, there are great risks not only for the detained, but also for jail workers and surrounding communities.

Read more and see interactive graphic of the Churn in America’s Jails

Coronavirus Pandemic: Santa Rita Jail Inmate Tests Positive; 77 New Cases In Alameda County
CBS SF Bay Area, April 4, 2020
Arizona Dept. of Corrections whistleblower discusses health risks of working in prison during pandemic
Fox10 Phoenix, By Matt Galka
Published April 1, 2020
Flattening the Curve for Incarcerated Populations — Covid-19 in Jails and Prisons
The New England Journal of Medicine, April 2, 2020
Matthew J. Akiyama, M.D., Anne C. Spaulding, M.D., and Josiah D. Rich, M.D

Preventing Community Spread of COVID-19 in Sites like Jails and Emergency Shelter

April 3, 2020, National League of Cities
By NLC Staff
Unhoused people staying in emergency shelter, individuals who are incarcerated or living in residential treatment programs, halfway houses and residential re-entry programs are at a unique risk for the spread of COVID-19.
Wealthy L.A. areas have higher rates of coronavirus cases.
Why those numbers are deceiving
LATimes, April 2, 2020
Wealthy areas saw an early surge in coronavirus cases in L.A. County. More accessible testing and international travel provide a likely explanation.
Read more
Technology in Times of Crisis: Why Ethics Are Essential

Sara Kassir, Blog, April 2020

Read the Blog

L.A. County presented with ambitious plan to change its justice system to system of care
CalMatters, by Kelly Lytle
March 29, 2020

A Plea To Governor Newsom: Don’t Abandon Elderly Incarcerated People To Die From Covid-19

Mar 30, 2020, The Appeal
by James King

We can’t allow “violent criminal” rhetoric to justify leaving some of the most vulnerable people in dangerous conditions.

Read More 

Governor Newsom Grants Executive Clemency 3.27.20

Mar 27, 2020, SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that he has granted five pardons and 21 commutations.
Why Hasn’t the Number of People in U.S. Jails Dropped?
Longer average stays are keeping the population high at a time of declining admissions
PEW, March 27, 2020
By: Jake Horowitz & Tracy Velázquez

California’s State Juvenile Justice Agency Freezes New Detention Commitments

March 25, 2020, by Jeremy Loudenback, Senior Editor
On Tuesday, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that the state would stop sending adults and juveniles to its correctional system, which includes the state’s juvenile justice agency.
First inmate in California’s prison system tests positive for coronavirus
LA Times, March 22, 2020
By Paige St. John
The prisoner is at California State Prison, Los Angeles County, state corrections officials announced on Sunday night.
The officials also said that five prison workers have COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Two are at California State Prison, Sacramento, outside of Folsom; one is at Folsom State Prison; and two are at the California Institution for Men in Chino.
The prisoner in L.A. County was in stable condition and being treated on site, according to a statement from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

Editorial boards in two most populous U.S. counties push for decarceration:

On Wednesday, the editorial board of the Los Angeles Times pointed out the ways in which a COVID-19 outbreak in jails and prisons is a crisis for incarcerated people, their families, and everyone else. The necessary response, the board wrote, is to quickly lower the number of incarcerated people. It applauds the steps taken thus far by Sheriff Alex Villanueva but calls for much more to be done. Specifically, the board adds, “Virtually no defendant should be admitted to jail during this emergency who does not pose a risk to public safety. By definition that includes anyone with bail set, whether they can pay it or not, and anyone subject to jail for a technical parole or probation violation.”

Read the Editorial

Yesterday, the editorial board of the Chicago Sun-Times called on county justice officials and the office of the Cook County chief judge to “to develop a process to more quickly release many more incarcerated people—without compromising public safety—who run a high risk of being felled by the disease.”

Read the Editorial

Coronavirus slows wheels of justice at Southern California courts
Los Angeles Daily News, March 16, 2020
By By Scott Schwebke and Tony Saavedra
The disruption is unprecedented compared to past responses to 9/11, the Northridge earthquake and drastic budget cuts
Historic County-Community Partnership Takes The Vote Behind Bars In LA County
Witness LA, by Taylor Walker
February 28, 2020 
....In the program’s first day — and the first day of early voting in California — nearly 2,200 incarcerated Angelenos were registered to vote — more than any previous year, according to Sheriff Villanueva....
...The sheriff, registrar-recorder, the ALCU of Southern California, the Los Angeles Regional Reentry Partnership, Susan Burton’s A New Way of Life, and the League of Women Voters – Los Angeles, are making history, Logan said, by ensuring incarcerated Angelenos have unprecedented access to voting education and opportunities this election...
How Jackie Lacey’s and George Gascón’s time in office shapes the L.A. County D.A.'s race
LA Times By James Queally
Feb. 18, 2020
Jackie Lacey and George Gascón spent more than three decades each working for and eventually running some of the nation’s largest law enforcement agencies. Yet, their visions to lead the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office couldn’t be more different.
America's Mental Health Crisis Hidden Behind Bars
NPR Morning Edition,
Zoë van Dijk, February 25, 2020
New inmates with a mental illness arrive daily in the Los Angeles County jail system. It now holds more than 5,000 inmates with a mental illness who've had run-ins with the law.
Tens of thousands of names appear on CalGang database, used by police across the state
Pasedena Weekly by Matthew Rodriguez | Feb 27, 2020
California Attorney General Xavier Becerra recently announced that the state Department of Justice is opening an investigation into the Los Angeles Police Department’s use of the controversial CalGang database.
Florida loses appeals court ruling on felon voting law
Politico, By Gary Fineout
02/19/2020
A legal and political battle over voting rights in Florida reached another milestone on Wednesday when a federal appeals court ruled that a law limiting the voting rights of people with felony convictions was unconstitutional.

L.A. County Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey announces dismissal of 66,000 marijuana convictions

LA Times, FEB. 13, 2020
By Alene Tchekmedyian, Leila Miller
Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey on Thursday announced that she had secured the dismissal of 66,000 marijuana convictions in Los Angeles County, marking a major step in a growing national effort to undo the harsh effects of a decades-long drug war.
Debating Measure R:
Expanding Civilian Oversight Of LA Sheriff’s Department
KPCC AirTalk
February 13, 2020
On March 3, Los Angeles County will vote on Measure R, which would give the L.A. Sheriff Department’s civilian oversight board increased subpoena power. It would also require the county to research and publish a plan that uses mental health treatment to lower the jail population.
Homeless In Southern California
LA County program aims to keep homeless, mentally ill from returning to jails
ABC News, By Jovana Lara, February 12, 2020

Sen. Harris Invites Elder Joe Paul to President’s State of the Union Address

The Los Angeles Sentinel
February 3, 2020, By Cora Jackson-Fossett

“Very excited” was the response of Elder Joseph Paul, Jr., upon learning that U.S. Senator Kamala Harris invited him to be her guest at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address on Tuesday, Feb. 4.

Read more

Mass Incarceration, Then and Now
The New Yorker Radio Hour
January 17, 2020, By David Remnick
What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?
The New Yorker Radio Hour
January 24, 2020, By David Remnick
LAPD making almost half as many arrests as a decade ago
Decline in bookings far outpaces drop in crime
Crosstown
January 16, 2020, By Ethan Ward
COLDPLAY Performs a Sold Out LA Concert Run at The Palladium – Supporting Local Prison Reform Efforts:
RESPECT Magazine
January 24, 2020 by Ayana Rashed
2019 was the year L.A. County finally said ‘no’ to new jails

LA Times, By The Times Editorial Board, Dec. 26, 2019

Jails are crowded with mentally ill people because states including California closed mental hospitals over several decades beginning in the 1960s without building out the system of community-based mental-health care they had promised. Jail populations are disproportionately black and Latino, in part because of a criminal justice system laced with overly punitive policies that prey on poverty and sentences that punish multiple generations. Building new jails — even ostensibly more humane ones — may sometimes be unavoidable, but it consumes resources that could otherwise be used for correcting the problems and improving lives.
This year — 2019 — was the year that the Board of Supervisors got the message.
Read More
The Hidden Cost of Incarceration
Prison costs taxpayers $80 billion a year. It costs some families everything they have.
The Marshall Project By Nicole Lewis and Beatrix Lockwood
U.S. Supreme Court leaves in place ruling barring prosecution of homeless
Reuters, by Dec. 16, 2019, Andrew Chung
From Marijuana To The Death Penalty, States Led The Way In 2019

The Appeal by Daniel Nichanian
Dec 20, 2019

A retrospective on the year that was on criminal justice reform. Seven maps. 16 issues. 50 states.
Ventura Training Center Provides Parolees Path in Firefighting

Spectrum News 1, By Tanya McRae Camarillo,Dec. 26, 2019