2018 - Final Legislative Update on LARRP Supported Bills

We are happy to share that 50% of the state bills that LARRP supported in this session were signed into law by the Governor. Please see our summary in the link below. You can find more detail about any of these bills by going to Leg Info.

Anyone interested in helping develop, track, and support bills for 2019, please write to info@lareentry.org with "Policy Committee" in the subject line.

Click Below for a fuller list of Bills signed or vetoed by Governor Brown

Governor Brown signs landmark legislation to remove barriers to licensing and decrease recidivism

Sacramento, CA—This past weekend, Governor Edmund "Jerry" Brown signed AB 2138, authored by Assemblymembers David Chiu and Evan Low, to remove barriers for occupational licensing for close to 8 million Californians living with criminal records.

AB 2138 was supported by a coalition of 50+ organizations, including East Bay Community Law Center (EBCLC), Root & Rebound, Legal Services for Prisoners with Children (LSPC), All of Us or None, Anti-Recidivism Coalition, Alameda County Public Defender, PolicyLink, the Alliance for Boys & Men of Color, the National Association of Social Workers, and many more.

AB 2138 opens pathways to family-sustaining careers to millions of Californians who have past justice system contact. The bill ensures that close to 40 licensing boards governed under the Department of Consumer Affairs cannot deny people otherwise trained and qualified for licenses due to irrelevant and dismissed convictions. Specifically, the bill creates a seven-year "washout" period after which licensing agencies cannot consider crimes that are not serious felonies, sex offenses, or relevant financial crimes. It also eliminates requirements that applicants self-disclose the details of their record prior to issuance of a California Department of Justice background check, freeing applicants from disclosing from memory alone and refocusing agencies on the facts of an applicant's record. AB 2138 also sets out criteria for considering an applicant's rehabilitation and bans the use of dismissed and sealed convictions, convictions for which a person received a Certificate of Rehabilitation, and non-conviction acts such as arrests that never led to conviction to deny licensure.

Studies have shown that states with more fair processes for occupational licensing have dramatically lower recidivism rates.

Many Californians are denied licenses to work in jobs they are qualified to perform due to old or irrelevant criminal records. In some cases, people are denied licenses for jobs they have performed successfully for years in the past without incident or were trained to do while incarcerated, simply because of a conviction for a minor offense unrelated to their job.

With AB 2138, Californians with criminal records will be able to access licenses for close to 40 occupations they were previously barred from or very unlikely to receive. Covered occupations range from automotive repair to psychology to cosmetology.

The signing of AB 2138 is a huge victory for all Californians.

2018 State Budget

On June 27, 2018 Governor Brown signed and enacted the 2018-19 state budget of over $200 Billion. See the public safety spending summary below.  The LARRP Policy and Legal Committee has prepared a brief of the key budget items for the reentry community available to members only.

Committee meetings

The Policy & Legal Committee has three primary functions.

  1. Organize and host free Record Change Clinics
  2. Host quarterly forums or workshops that further develop policy and advocacy skills
  3. Develop and advocate for the implementation of legislative and administrative policies that reduce recidivism, improve public safety and social justice, safeguard the rights of victims, and decrease incarceration levels while providing accountability to taxpayers, protecting against cost liability, and reducing structural inequalities.

LARRP Policy Priorities

Committee Charter: To develop and advocate for the implementation of legislative and administrative policies that reduce recidivism, improve public safety and social justice, safeguard the rights of victims, and decrease incarceration levels while providing accountability to taxpayers, protecting against costly liability, and reducing structural inequalities.

  1. Remove Barriers to Reentry
  2. Reduce Incarceration Rates and Eliminate Discrimination in the Justice System
  3. Develop a Robust Community ReentrySystem

Committee charter

Policy Committee charter, structure and activities as of July 2012 - click to see or download PDF

Click here for the 2015-16 Committee goals and objectives.

‘Keep California Safe’ initiative fails to make the November 2018 ballot
By SAL RODRIGUEZ |OPINION | Orange County Register

July 2, 2018

he much-hyped Reducing Crime and Keeping California Safe Act of 2018 has failed to make the November 2018 ballot.